Irish Terrier vs Austrailian Blue Heeler - Breed Comparison

Irish Terrier vs Austrailian Blue HeelerAustrailian Blue Heeler is originated from Australia but Irish Terrier is originated from Ireland. Both Austrailian Blue Heeler and Irish Terrier are of same height. Both Austrailian Blue Heeler and Irish Terrier are having almost same weight. Both Austrailian Blue Heeler and Irish Terrier has almost same life span. Both Austrailian Blue Heeler and Irish Terrier has almost same litter size. Austrailian Blue Heeler requires High Maintenance. But Irish Terrier requires Moderate Maintenance

Basic Information

Group:
Herding dogs
Terrier dog
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Australia
Ireland
Height Male:
45 - 50 cm
17 - 20 inches
45 - 50 cm
17 - 20 inches
Height Female:
43 - 48 cm
16 - 19 inches
45 - 50 cm
17 - 20 inches
Weight Male:
14 - 16 kg
30 - 36 pounds
11 - 12 kg
24 - 27 pounds
Weight Female:
12 - 14 kg
26 - 31 pounds
11 - 12 kg
24 - 27 pounds
Life Span:
12 - 16 Years
13 - 15 Years
Litter Size:
1 - 7
4 - 6
Size:
Medium
Medium
Other Names:
Queensland Heeler
Irish Red Terrier
Colors Available:
blue, red
sandy, golden, Red, wheaten
Coat:
blue speckled or red speckled with dark or cream marks
Shortish, wiry, dense
Shedding:
Constant
Minimal
Temperament:
Alert, Courageous, Curious, Energetic, Independent, Intelligent, Lively, Loyal, Outgoing, Playful, Protective, Responsive, Social, Territorial
Affectionate, Alert, Cheerful, Courageous, Curious, Energetic, Friendly, Independent, Intelligent, Lively, Loving, Loyal, Outgoing, Playful, Protective, Responsive, Social, Stubborn, Territorial
Grooming:
High Maintenance
Moderate Maintenance
Trainability:
Easy
Easy
Hypoallergenic:
No
Yes
Kids Friendly:
Yes
Yes
New Owners Friendly:
No
Yes

History

austrailian blue heelerIn 1840, George Elliott made a match with Australian Dingo and Collie and got a clever and very active dog breed – Australian Blue Heeler. Soon, he showed his good herding instincts and protective nature and got really popular among the cattlemen and ranchers. Soon, as the USA soldiers arrived in Australia, they decided that it will be a great dog to bring home.

Australian Blue Heeler has short, double coat. The coat is water resistant and helps them when the temperature is too high as well. Their coat is rough to the touch, naturally. They can be found in blue or red coat colour mix. The Blue Heeler isn’t actually blue, but their black coat has a bluish tint. Red Heelers have red fur instead of black. They have long tails, strong legs, Dingo-like heads with pointy ears and muscular necks and balanced and athletic bodies.

irish terrierThe Irish Terrier is a dog breed from Ireland and one of the many different terrier breeds there are.

Nobody is too sure of the Irish Terrier's history but it is one of the oldest terrier breeds. It appears as if the dog breed was developed from a wheat colored terrier and the extinct black and tan terrier.

It was always a common practice to crop the ears of terriers, but in 1889 the Irish Terrier Club required that the ears remain uncropped. The first Irish Terrier was shown in 1881, and the first Irish Terrier registered with the American Kennel Club was in 1885. The Irish Terrier Club of America was founded in 1896.

Description

austrailian blue heeler puppyThis breed is somehow designed for an outdoor life and outdoor activity. This implies that Blue Heelers have nature made of the high dose of energy. They are always ready to go anywhere you go, and they will be a loyal friend. They are actually very clever, intelligent and ready to help.

If you are a type of the person who prefers being indoors and having minimal physical activity, Blue heelers are not the type of a furry companion for you. They have a high daily need for the activity, and they love having lots of space to run and explore. Sometimes, you will realize that having a leash is a must because they will get so playful that they will forget about you!

If you start teaching them to be friendly with other dogs while they are still pups, they will accept that kind of lifestyle. But, if your Blue Heeler is raised as the only dog on the ranch, note that they won’t be very friendly toward other dogs.

Since most of the herd dogs usually respond to only one person, most of the Blue Heelers can follow this old instinct. They can be very independent, as well, and they are usually not the type of the dog that will always be around your leg waiting for a cuddle or ear scratch. But, they build the respect towards humans depending on how they treat him so they can be very lovable and friendly pets.

If you are still confused about their name, you must know that the Blue Heelers can actually lightly nip your heel for attention. They are not aggressive, but they tend to be very protective of the family, humans around them and their property.

irish terrier puppyThe Irish Terrier is a medium sized dog who stands between 45cm and 50cm and weighs in the region of 11 to 12kg. He has a short, dense, wiry double coat which is a red, golden, sandy, wheaten color.

The ears of the dog are semi-erect/semi-floppy and the tail is held high and curved.The chest is deep and muscular and the front and back legs are strong, long and muscular.

Temperament:

The Irish Terrier is a companion dog today, even though he was once a guard- and hunting dog. He is an amicable dog while also being alert and active. He is also independent and strong-willed so he will require training and socialization as then he becomes obedient and relaxed and much easier to live with.

They're social dogs too, loving all the members of their human family, getting on well with children in the home.

Health Problems

Eye problems

austrailian blue heeler dogProgressive Retinal Atrophy usually causes slow and painless loss of sight. This process takes years, but there are cases where this disease took only months before the dog ended up completely blind. It is advisable to take your Blue Heeler to the vet for a test that can tell you if your dog is carrying the gene for this disease.

Lens luxation is a disease where the lens of dog’s eye separates partially or completely. Good news is that this disease can be treated.

Joint diseases

Most common is the hip or elbow dysplasia. This is the disease where hip joints do not develop properly and begin to grind. This condition can sometimes be treated with physiotherapy, but there is a chance that your Blue Heeler will need a surgery. If you have a habit of regular vet checks and keeping your dog slim and fed with quality food, you can a make a big difference.

Osteochondritis Dissecans (OCD) causes the dog to have excess cartilage and deficient bone, where cartilage does not get replaced by bone during fetal development. This disease usually requires surgery and prescribed medicines.

Deafness

Congenital hereditary sensorineural deafness – CHSD is a common form of deafness.

Bilateral deafness can be identified when the dog is still a puppy, more-less at six weeks of age. A puppy with deafness in only one ear is harder to identify, but it can happen.

Portosystemic shunt means that the blood flow is getting back into the bloodstream instead of passing through the liver. That means that liver can’t clear out the toxins, and the organ itself fails to grow properly. This inherited type of shunt can be treated with surgery if the diagnose is set on time.

irish terrier dogThe Irish Terrier is a healthy dog breed and you won't find yourself running to the vet often with him, but still he can land up with one of the common dog problems.

It is always wise to be aware of hip dysplasia as this is a disease which can occur in all dog breeds and all dog ages. Also look out for eye diseases such as progressive retinal atrophy and cataracts as these can lead to blindness in your pet.

There is a disease known as cystinuria which is quite a concern with Irish Terriers. It’s an inherited kidney disease where increased amounts of arginine, lysine, amino acids cystine and ornithine are excreted in the urine.

In well-functioning kidneys, blood is filtered so as to create urine. Cystine is reabsorbed back into the bloodstream but with dogs affected with cystinuria they cannot reabsorb cystine back in their bloodstream, causing an accumulation in the urine. Dogs with cystinuria suffer inflammation of the urinary tract and can also develop urinary blockage and kidney failure. Immediate veterinary intervention is required.

Caring The Pet

Feeding the puppy

austrailian blue heeler puppiesChoose a dog food that will provide nutrients that will help in the bone developing. Since they are more likely to suffer from joint diseases, you must take this advice seriously. It would be great if you speak about this with your vet before you choose food on your own.

Feeding the adult

The best food for Blue Heeler is a high-quality food which supplies them with premium nutrition to fuel their activity.

They also drink a lot of water, so be sure that they always have a fresh water available.

Points for Good Health

Lots and lots of the outdoor activity and a quality food. You must be very cautious because this kind of dogs gets overweight easily because they just love the treats and extra food portion.

Games and Exercises

Any outdoor activity that is mentally challenging and interesting enough to keep them from running in the field trying to catch anything that moves.

Grooming:

irish terrier puppiesThe coat of the Irish Terrier requires a brush twice a week to keep it bright. If you intend showing your dog, the coat will need to be stripped a couple of times a year to maintain the texture and color.

Other Irish Terrier owners take their dog to the groomers to have the coat clipped. The dog doesn't shed a lot and they are referred to as being somewhat hypoallergenic.

As with any other dog breed, other grooming needs with your Irish Terrier will include clipping the nails, checking his teeth for plaque build-up and checking inside the ears for infection.

If you're unsure how to perform these grooming procedures with your pet, simply ask your vet who will explain to you precisely how to ensure your dog remains in tip top condition.

Exercise:

He's a fairly active dog so you want to make sure that you are attending to his exercise needs. Take him for a walk every day, and if you've got a good sized garden, throw a ball for him. If you're a jogger you can count him in.

Diet:

What you feed your Irish Terrier will depend a lot on his age and his activity levels. Every dog is a unique individual and nothing is set in stone regarding their diets. Just like people though, feeding him a lot of junk food will contribute to illness and shorten his lifespan.

He needs quality food. If you buy commercially manufactured food, make sure to read up on how much to feed him. Try and mix in some cooked chicken, brown rice and vegetables from time to time as well as some raw meat.

Learn to know what foods are toxic for him. Make sure he has a bowl of fresh, cool water constantly available to him.

Characteristics

Children friendliness

austrailian blue heeler dogsThey are generally good with children, but you must be aware of their inherent desire to herd. Always supervise when your Blue Heeler is around small children.

Special Talents

Ball tricks, frisbee fun, running companion, herding cattle.

Adaptability

It is best to buy a puppy. These dogs get attached to one human and to the territory.

Learning ability

They are generally quick learners. If you teach them to be playful, friendly and loving, they will learn it in no time. So be aware of the decisions that can cost you when the dog grows up.

irish terrier dogsIrish Terriers are good with people and want to be an active member of their human families.

They are active dogs and will require ongoing mental and physical stimulation. This is a lively dog, but he still loves to spend quiet time indoors with his family.

They’re intelligent dogs with a strong sense of loyalty towards their owner, making excellent family pets.

Comparison with other breeds

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  39. Irish Terrier vs Doberman Pinscher - Breed Comparison
  40. Irish Terrier vs American Bully - Breed Comparison
  41. Irish Terrier vs Abruzzenhund - Breed Comparison
  42. Irish Terrier vs Affenpinscher - Breed Comparison
  43. Irish Terrier vs Afghan Hound - Breed Comparison
  44. Irish Terrier vs Aidi - Breed Comparison
  45. Irish Terrier vs Airedale Terrier - Breed Comparison
  46. Irish Terrier vs Akbash Dog - Breed Comparison
  47. Irish Terrier vs Akita - Breed Comparison
  48. Irish Terrier vs Africanis - Breed Comparison
  49. Irish Terrier vs Askal - Breed Comparison
  50. Irish Terrier vs Atlas Terrier - Breed Comparison